Appendix: Individuals Mentioned in the Record Book

“Appendix: Individuals Mentioned in the Record Book,” in Richard Neitzel Holzapfel and Andrew H. Hedges, eds., Within These Prison Walls: Lorenzo Snow’s Record Book, 1886–1897 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center; Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2010), 125–50.

Appendix

Individuals Mentioned in the Record Book

Isabel Ball was born October 14, 1872, in Salt Lake City to John Price Ball and Phoebe Birkenhead. [1] She married James W. Ure Jr. on June 26, 1895, in Salt Lake City. [2] Isabel died January 17, 1906. [3]

John Price Ball was born October 4, 1828, in Coalville, Leicestershire, England, to James Ball and Isabel Price. Ball married Emma Henderson April 2, 1859, in Loughborough, England. [4] Ball married Phobe Birkenhead on March 4, 1870, in Salt Lake City. [5] On November 7, 1885, he was arrested on the charge of unlawful cohabitation [6] and on February 27, 1886, was sentenced by Judge Zane to six months’ imprisonment and a $300 fine. [7] When his prison sentence was up on August 30, 1886, Ball was not released from the penitentiary with others whose sentences had been served, because he declined to pay his fine. [8] He died October 16, 1890, in Salt Lake City. [9]

Samuel Frederick Ball was born April 14, 1849, in Stock Cross, Berkshire, England, to Samuel Leonard Ball and Hannah Maria Marshall. [10] He married Margaret Poiney March 23, 1873, in Brighton, England. [11] Ball later married Ellen (Nellie) Maria Powell and Margaret Brown. Ball’s Church service included president of the Lambeth Branch in the England conference, patriarch of the Salt Lake Stake, [12] president of the Second Quorum of the Seventy, first counselor to Bishop Theodore McKean in the Twenty-ninth Ward, member of President George Q. Cannon’s prayer circle, and superintendent of Sunday School in the Twenty-second Ward. [13] He was arrested January 6, 1886, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation [14] and on March 1, 1886, was sentenced by Judge Zane to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [15] Ball was released from the penitentiary September 4, 1886. [16] He died December 13, 1923, in Salt Lake City. [17]

William Green Bickley was born May 1, 1842, in Small Hill, England, to parents Samuel Bickley and Mary Green. [18] He came to Utah in 1862, where he eventually settled in Minersville, Beaver County. [19] Bickley married Jane Walton on March 21, 1867, in Pine Valley, Utah. [20] His occupation in Beaver was that of a music leader. [21] Bickley was arrested May 15, 1886, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation and on May 27, 1886, was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [22] He was released from the penitentiary November 29, 1886. [23] He died August 9, 1917, in Beaver, Utah. [24]

Melissa (or Malissa) Canfield Borlase was born August 26, 1852, in Ogden, Utah, to parents Cyrus C. Canfield and Clarissa Jones. [25] Mrs. Borlase married Rawsel Bradford on July 17, 1869, and later she married John Borlase about 1878 in Utah. [26] Her duties in the Church included offices in the Sunday School and Relief Society. She died February 10, 1912, in Midvale, Utah. [27]

John Bowen was born September 12, 1841, in Abersychan, Monmouth, Wales, to Lewis Bowen and Mary Ann Harris. [28] He came to the United States in 1862 to join his brother, David. Together they worked to earn money to bring the rest of the family to Utah. [29] In 1863 Bowen moved with his family to Tooele, Utah. He married Hannah Johnson in January, 1877. He also married Eliza Elizabeth Craner on October 10, 1880. [30] Bowen was arrested on the charges of polygamy and unlawful cohabitation July 16, 1885. [31] On February 17, 1886, he was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. He was taken to the penitentiary that afternoon [32] and was released August 20, 1886. [33] He died September 20, 1922, in Tooele, Utah. [34]

Rosena Singleton Bromley was born April 17, 1852, in Portsmouth, England, to Francis Singleton and Amelia Ann Williams. [35] She came to America with her parents in 1864. They arrived in Utah November 2, 1864, with the Warren Snow company. [36] She married William Michael Bromley July 19, 1870, in Salt Lake City. [37] Mrs. Bromley died February 25, 1918, in American Fork, Utah. [38]

William Michael Bromley was born October 13, 1839, in Worcester, England, to John Bromley and Mary Oxenbold. William left for America with his family in 1851 and arrived in Utah by himself (due to the deaths of family members) in 1855. He settled in Springfield, Utah, where he worked as a blacksmith, farmer, and bookkeeper. He married Elizabeth Roylance November 10, 1858, in Springville, Utah. He later married three other women: Rosena Singleton on July 19, 1870, in Salt Lake City, Caroline Whiting in 1879 in Salt Lake City, and Beulah Chipman in March 1885 in American Fork, Utah. [39] Bromley was arrested on January 11, 1886, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation [40] and on April 13, 1886, was sentenced to ten months in prison and a $300 fine. [41] He entered the penitentiary August 3, 1886, [42] and was released February 9, 1887. [43] He died April 14, 1911, in American Fork, Utah. [44]

Thomas Burningham was born to Thomas Burningham and Sarah White. He came to Utah by 1861. Burningham married Ellen Hook in 1861 in Bountiful, Utah. He later married Lucina Sessions. Burningham’s Church service included being a ward teacher, high priest, serving a mission to England, and acting as a member of the Seventieth Quorum of Seventies. [45] He was “arrested on a trumped up charge of threatening to kill, brought to Salt Lake City . . . [and] charged with unlawful cohabitation” on July 17, 1885. [46] He was pronounced guilty of unlawful cohabitation on February 10, 1886, and was sentenced to six months in prison and a three-hundred dollar fine on February 17, 1886. [47] Burningham was released from the penitentiary August 20, 1886. [48] He died in 1893 in Salt Lake City. [49]

Maria Burrows was born November 5, 1870, in Nottingham, England. [50] She was the daughter of Elisabeth Holmes and William Burrows and came to Utah with them in 1872. [51] She married Franklin Crow (the son of Charles Henry Crow and Mary Sharp) on September 12, 1894, in Salt Lake City. [52] She was honored as Utah’s first war mother when her son Raymond Crow was killed in action in France, the first Utahn to lose his life in World War I. She was also a charter member of the Utah Chapter, Gold Star Mothers and also a member of the Service Star-Legion for many years. She and her husband were the parents of six children, five of which lived to adulthood. [53] She was a resident of Salt Lake City for over sixty years and died at her home in Los Angeles on December 31, 1950. [54]

There are two possible George Bywaters. The only ones found were father and son:

1. George Gwilym Bywater was born November 15, 1828, in Bedwelty, Wales, to George Henry Bywater and Elinor Gwillym. He married Martha Jones, the daughter of Rees Rees Jones and Martha Phillips on November 27, 1854, in Salt Lake City. George and Martha were the parents of seven children, all born in Salt Lake City. Bywater served as a teacher in his ward, as president of a quorum of seventy, and as a missionary. [55] He died May 16, 1898, in Salt Lake City. [56]

2. George Jones Bywater was born November 10, 1855, in Salt Lake City to George Gwilym Bywater and Martha Jones. He married Jeannette Russell Yeates, the daughter of William Yeates and Margaret Fife, on July 28, 1856, in Salt Lake City. George and Jeannette were the parents of six children, born in Logan and Salt Lake City. George died November 6, 1899, in Salt Lake City. [57]

John Thomas Caine was born January 8, 1829, on the Isle of Man, Parish of Kirkpatrick, England, to Thomas Caine and Elinor Cubbon.  [58] In 1846 Caine immigrated to the United States. He married Margaret Nightingale October 22, 1850, in St. Louis, Missouri. Caine and his family made the trip to Utah and arrived in Salt Lake September 20, 1852. [59] He also became involved in politics and held the positions of, among others, territorial and state legislator, territorial delegate in Congress, member of the Constitutional Convention of 1882, and member of House of Representatives in 1883. [60] Later, after retiring from Congress in 1893, Caine was auditor of accounts for Utah Territory and superintendent of waterworks for Salt Lake City. He was also one of the original stockholders and directors of Zion’s Savings Bank and Trust Company as well as the director, secretary, and treasurer of the Joseph Agricultural and Stock Company. Caine’s church service included a mission to the Sandwich Islands, where he was a counselor to the mission president, Silas Smith, as well as a teacher and high counselor. [61] He died September 20, 1911, in Salt Lake City. [62]

Abraham Hoagland Cannon was born March 12, 1859, in Salt Lake City to George Q. Cannon and Elizabeth Hoagland. [63] Cannon married four times. His first marriage was to Sarah A. Jenkins. He later married Wilhelmina M. Cannon, Mary Croxall, and Lillian Hamblin. [64] Cannon was involved in many companies in Utah. Some of the positions he held included director of the State Bank of Utah, director of the Utah Loan and Trust Company, director of ZCMI, and director of the Co-Operative Furniture Company. [65] He also worked closely with the Juvenile Instructor, the Contributor, and the Deseret News. [66] He was arrested April 28, 1885, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation and was placed under a $1,500 bond. [67] On March 17, 1886, Cannon was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [68] He was released from the penitentiary August 17, 1886. [69] He died July 19, 1896, in Salt Lake City, at thirty-seven years of age. [70]

Alice Cannon was born January 11, 1882, in Salt Lake City to Angus M. and Cordelia Moses Cannon. [71] She married Joseph LeRoy Cheney on November 14, 1906, in Salt Lake City. Her church service included: Relief Society, Primary president, and Sunday School teacher. Alice Cannon Cheney died March 18, 1967, in Centerville, Utah. [72]

Leonora M. Cannon was born to Sarah Maria Mousley and Angus M. Cannon on October 2, 1874, in Salt Lake City. [73] On September 13, 1899, Miss Cannon married Barnard J. Stewart in Salt Lake City. [74] She was one of the first students at LDS University and attended the University of Utah. She served as president of the University Ward Relief Society and in the Ensign Stake Relief Society Presidency. Leonora Cannon Stewart died September 24, 1961, in Salt Lake City. [75]

Wilhelmina Mousley Cannon was born July 23, 1859, in Salt Lake City, the oldest daughter of Angus M. Cannon, an early Church official, and Ann Amanda Cannon. She was married first to Abraham Hoagland Cannon of the Council of the Twelve. He died in 1896 and she married Fred Arden Ellis January 17, 1901, in Ogden, Utah. [76] Wilhelmina Cannon Ellis died October 6, 1941, in Salt Lake City. [77]

Lydia Spencer Clawson was born on November 13, 1860, in Utah to Daniel Spencer and Mary Jane Cutcliffe. [78] She married Rudger Clawson March 29, 1883, in Salt Lake City (marriage card says October 26, 1887, in Salt Lake City), Utah as his second wife. [79] On October 24, 1884, Lydia was arrested and sent to the Utah Penitentiary because she refused to testify in her husband’s trial for unlawful cohabitation. The next day, October 25, 1884, she admitted to being Rudger Clawson’s wife. Minutes after she had confessed, the jury “returned a verdict of guilty against [Rudger] Clawson.” [80] Mrs. Clawson died February 1, 1941, in Salt Lake City. [81]

Rudger Clawson was born March 12, 1857, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Hiram Brandley Clawson and Margaret Gay Judd. [82] He married Florence A. Dinwoodey in 1882 in Salt Lake City. He later married Lydia Spencer on March 29, 1883, in Salt Lake City. [83] Clawson served in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from October 10, 1898, until his death. [84] He was also sustained as Second Counselor to President Lorenzo Snow on October 6, 1901, but was never set apart due to the death of President Snow four days later. [85] Additionally, Clawson served as Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from June 1, 1919, to March 2, 1921, and as President of the Twelve Apostles from March 17, 1921, until his death. [86] Clawson was arrested April 24, 1884, on the charge of polygamy and was placed under bonds of $3,000. [87] Clawson’s trial began October 15, 1884, and continued for six days. However, since the jury could not agree on a decision, they were discharged and preparations were made for a new trial. On October 24, 1884, Clawson’s second wife, Lydia, was arrested and taken to the Utah Penitentiary because she refused to testify at her husband’s trial. She was released from prison the following day when she admitted to being Clawson’s wife. After Lydia’s confession, Rudger Clawson was declared guilty of polygamy and was sentenced to four years in prison and an eight-hundred-dollar fine. [88] While he was in prison, Clawson’s first wife, Florence Dinwoodey, divorced him on July 25, 1885. [89] He was released from the penitentiary December 12, 1887, after being pardoned by the president of the United States, Grover Cleveland. [90] Clawson was imprisoned a total of three years, one month, and ten days. [91] He died June 21, 1943. [92]

Grover Cleveland was born March 13, 1837, in Caldwell, New Jersey, [93] to Richard Falley Cleveland and Anne Neal. [94] He married Frances Folsom June 2, 1886. [95] Cleveland worked as an attorney until 1884 and held positions such as that of sheriff of Erie County, mayor of Buffalo, and governor of New York. [96] In 1884 he ran as the Democratic candidate for President of the United States and won. He served his first term from 1885 to 1888. He served his second term as President from 1893 to 1896. [97] After his service as the President of the United States, Cleveland did consulting and writing. He also became a trustee of Princeton University. He died June 24, 1908, in Princeton, New Jersey. [98]

William James Cox was born June 19, 1815, in Nashville, Tennessee. [99] He was one of the first Latter-day Saints to colonize San Bernardino, California, in 1851. [100] After this area was established he returned to Utah and settled in Beaver, Utah. [101] His Church service included callings such as High Counselor, San Bernardino Branch President, and a member of the Twenty-second Quorum of the Seventy. Cox also held a seat in the House of Representatives beginning in 1862. [102] He married March 3, 1851, to Delilah Forrester or Forrest. He married a second wife, Josephine Willis, July 21, 1860, in Beaver, Utah; a third wife, Elizabeth Entwhistle, on October 4, 1862; and a fourth wife, Mary Ann Forrester or Forrest, on October 28, 1872. [103] Cox was arrested on the charge of unlawful cohabitation in April 1886. [104] May 27, 1886, he was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [105] Cox was discharged from the Utah Penitentiary on November 29, 1886. [106]

Elizabeth Ann (or Lizzie) Cutler was born June 22, 1861, to Harmon Cutler and Lucy Ann Pettigrew. [107] She was a public school teacher. [108] She married Aaron Henry Williams September 7, 1894, in Salt Lake City. [109] Lizzie died in Idaho about June 1914. [110]

Charles Denney was born on August 11, 1849, in London, Middlesex County, England, to Charles Denny and Mary Ann Dangerfield. [111] He was baptized at age nine and immigrated to the United States in 1866. Denney married Sarah Ann Gold in 1872 in Utah. He also married Lucy Flowers in 1876, although they agreed to separate after he served in the Penitentiary for unlawful cohabitation. He worked at the Deseret News as a typesetter. Denney's church service included positions as choir leader, secretary of the YMMIA, assistant secretary to Beekeepers Society, and a member of the Quorum of the Seventy. [112] He was arrested April 17, 1886, for unlawful cohabitation and placed under $1,000 bond. [113] On June 1, 1886, He was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [114] He was released from the penitentiary December 1, 1886. He died September 11, 1937, in Murray, Utah. [115]

Francis Hilliard Dyer, also known as Frank or Marshal Dyer, was born September 5, 1854, in Yazoo City, Mississippi, to parents Frank B. and Winifred S. Dyer. [116] He arrived in Salt Lake City April 6, 1876, and on July 8, 1880, married Ellen F. Tavey, with whom he had three children. President Grover Cleveland appointed Dyer as U.S. marshal for the Utah Territory on April 12, 1886, and he received his commission on June 16 that same year. On November 7, 1887, he was appointed by the Supreme Court of Utah to be the receiver of confiscated Church property for the federal government during the Edmunds-Tucker Act. Marshal Frank Dyer was not active in religion, but played an active role in politics as a Democrat. He died March 25, 1892, in Salt Lake City. [117]

Hyrum Pearse Folsom was born September 1, 1841, in Buffalo, New York, to parents William Harrison Folsom and Zerviah Eliza Clark. He married Nancy Broadbent December 29, 1866, in Salt Lake City. He married a second wife, Annie Eliza Lenzi, on January 4, 1879, in Salt Lake City. [118] He was imprisoned for unlawful cohabitation on September 25, 1886, and was released February 24, 1887, with a three hundred dollar fine. [119] He died September 23, 1924, in Salt Lake City. [120]

Herbert John Foulger was born January 10, 1848, in Islington, London, England, to John Foulger and Susannah Woolnough. Foulger arrived in Utah October 3, 1863, with the Daniel McArthur company. Foulger married Eliza Mary Hazel April 24, 1871. [121] He was arrested October 31, 1885, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation. November 7, 1885, Foulger pled not guilty to the charge and was placed under $3,500 bonds. [122] February 11, 1883, he was pronounced guilty of unlawful cohabitation and on February 26 was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [123] He was not released from prison with others on August 30, 1886, because he had not paid his fine, which he “declined to do.” Foulger was released from the penitentiary September 2, 1886.[124] He died December 6, 1920, in Salt Lake City. [125]

Delila Rebecca Gardner was born June 28, 1878, in Spanish Fork, Utah, to Neil Gardner and Helene Regina Evenson. [126] She married Joseph Hughes, the son of Morgan Hughes and Hannah David, on August 14, 1901, in Salt Lake City. They were the parents of nine children. Delila taught school in Spanish Fork before she married. She served in the Church as a Sunday School teacher, on the Stake Primary Board, as Ward Relief Society President, and as Stake Relief Society President. [127] She died September 21, 1955, in Spanish Fork, Utah. [128]

Susa Young Gates was born March 18, 1856, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Brigham Young and Lucy Bigelow. [129] In 1872, she married Alma B. Dunford and had two children, but the couple divorced in 1877 while he was serving a mission. She married Jacob F. Gates in 1880. [130] Her writing was published in the Deseret News, Juvenile Instructor, Women’s Exponent, and Young Woman’s Journal. She submitted much of her writing under the pen name “Homespun.” [131] Susa taught theology, domestic science, and music at the Brigham Young Academy. She also accompanied her husband on a four-year mission to the Sandwich Islands from 1885 to 1889. In 1911 she was appointed to the General Board of Relief Societies. [132] Mrs. Gates died May 27, 1933, in Salt Lake City. [133]

Hyrum Goff was born July 29, 1849, in Long Whatton, Leicestershire, England, to Isaac Goff and Mary Taylor. Goff married Maria T. Arnold January 2, 1871. He later married Marinda P. Bateman on October 24, 1878, in Salt Lake City. His community service included being the first mayor of Midvale, Utah, in 1909. [134] Goff was ordained to the office of the Quorum of the Seventy on January 3, 1877. Goff was also a member of the presidency of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy from 1887 to 1891, first counselor in the bishopric of the West Jordan Ward from 1891 to 1895, Bishop of the East Jordan Ward in 1895, and President of the Jordan Stake from 1900 to 1901. [135] Goff was arrested on January 13, 1886, on the charge of unlawful cohabitation and taken to Salt Lake City. [136] On February 16, 1886, Goff was declared guilty of polygamy and on March 3, 1886, he was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [137] On September 7, 1886, Goff completed his required prison sentence, was taken to Commissioner McKay, and then was taken back to the penitentiary because he was not “allowed to take the oath required, in order to avoid paying fine and costs of suit.” “After a hearing before Judge Zane, in the Third District Court, on a writ of habeas corpus, Hyrum Goff was released from imprisonment, by paying his fine.” [138] Hyrum Goff died November 24, 1914, in Midvale, Utah. [139]

Maria T. Arnold Goff was born May 1, 1855, to Josiah Arnold and Clarissa L. Jones. Maria married Hyrum Goff as his first wife on January 2, 1871. [140] Maria had six sons and six daughters, four of whom died in their early childhood. [141] Their family lived in West Jordan, Utah. [142] Maria died May 3, 1932, in Midvale, Utah. [143]

Marinda P. Bateman Goff was born September 29, 1861, in West Jordan, Utah, to parents Samuel Bateman and Marinda Allen. She married Hyrum Goff as a plural wife on October 24, 1878, in Salt Lake City, and they resided in West Jordan, Utah. [144] They were the parents of three sons and five daughters. [145] Marinda Goff died in West Jordan on October 5, 1902. [146]

John Wesley Greenman was born about 1840 in Ohio. [147] Greenman married Ann about 1866. The family lived in Wisconsin before moving to Utah. Once in Utah, Greenman worked as a Deputy U.S. Marshal in Salt Lake City. [148] Greenman had close surveillance of the Mormon prisoners who were serving time in the Utah Penitentiary for unlawful cohabitation. [149] Captain Greenman died at Oregon State Soldiers’ home at Roseburg, Oregon, on April 1, 1917. [150]

Catherine (or Katherine, Kathryn) Houtz Groesbeck was born October 6, 1862, in Springville, Utah, to parents Jacob Houtz and Bridget Dailey. [151] She became the third wife of Nicholas H. Groesbeck on July 21, 1882, in Salt Lake City. They had four children: two boys and two girls. [152] She later married Mathias Erick Wahlin on September 11, 1901. [153] She died October 28, 1929, in Springville, Utah. [154]

Nicholas Harmon Groesbeck was born April 27, 1842, in Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, to parents Nicholas Groesbeck and Elizabeth Thompson. [155] He came to Utah with his family on October 2, 1856. [156] He married three times: Rhoda Sanderson Dec 16, 1862, in Springville, Utah; Cornelia Melissa Sanford June 28, 1869, in Salt Lake City; and Katheryn Houtz July 21, 1882. [157] In 1871 he served a mission to Kentucky, Ohio, and Illinois. Nicholas died March 29, 1923, in Springville, Utah. [158]

Rhoda Rebecca Groesbeck was born November 16, 1868, in Springville, Utah, to Nicholas H. Groesbeck and Rhoda Sanderson. Rhoda married H. M. “Mack” Dougall in Springville in 1891. [159] Mrs. Groesbeck died October 2, 1956, in Springville, Utah. [160]

Jens Hansen was born March 15 in Gjerslev, Hlbk, Denmark, to parents Hans Jensen and Margrete Christensen. He married Bertha Jorgensen March 24, 1862, in Copenhagen, Denmark, and he married Kirsten Henricksen June 4, 1864, in Salt Lake City. [161] In 1881 he was called on a mission to Nebraska. He spent one year there and then transferred to the Scandinavian mission. [162] He served as second counselor in the Mill Creek Ward. On April 9, 1886, he was arrested on charges of unlawful cohabitation and sentenced June 2 with a $300 fine. [163] He was released December 2, 1886, but was arrested again April 27, 1888. [164] Jens Hansen died September 10, 1917, from being struck by an automobile on September 7, 1917. [165]

Ephraim Jensen was born in Brigham City, Utah, November 4, 1857, the son of Hans Peter Jensen and Sarah Clausen. In 1882 he filled a mission to the Northern States and on May 1, 1884, he married Mary Harriet (Hattie) Critchlow. They were the parents of five sons and three daughters. In 1889 he became sheriff and justice of the peace in Brigham City. He served in the superintendency of the Logan Fifth Ward Sunday School. He served a mission to the eastern states in 1898 and then was called by President Lorenzo Snow to be the custodian of the Tabernacle grounds, and under the direction of the President, he established the Bureau of Information. He died October 24, 1939, in Salt Lake City. [166]

Mary Harriet (Hattie) Critchlow Jensen was born January 31, 1864, in Riverdale, Utah, a daughter of William F. Critchlow and Mary Eliza Brown. She was married to Ephraim Jensen May 1, 1884. She served as Relief Society President of the Ocean Park branch in California and was appointed to a committee which prepared outlines of study for the Salt Lake Stake Relief Society. She was a member of the first women’s committee of the Utah Genealogical Society, the Daughters of Utah Pioneers, and Daughters of the Mormon Battalion. She died April 4, 1948, in Salt Lake City. [167]

Edna Leone Snow Lambert was born November 27, 1871, in Manti, Utah, to parents Gardner Elisha Snow and Ester Phelena Cox. She married Angus M. Lambert on February 11, 1891, in Manti, Utah. She served in the Relief Society organization and was a member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Mrs. Lambert died May 22, 1957, in Cedar City, Utah. [168]

Mary Alice Lambert was born August 10, 1878, to parents George C. Lambert and Mary Alice Needham. [169] She married John Gray Peart on November 24, 1898, in Salt Lake City. [170] Her husband married twice more in 1893 and 1901. She was a member of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. She died July 21, 1899, in Salt Lake City. [171]

Lillian Fannie (or Fanny Lillian) Loveland was born September 1, 1871 in Brigham City, Utah to parents Chester Carlos Loveland and Mary Ann Barnes. [172] She married first to Alviras Snow January 30, 1889, in Logan, Utah. [173] There must have been a divorce because she married a second time to Karl Emil Maeser, the son of Karl G. Maeser and Anna Henrietta Theresa Mieth on March 29, 1894 in Logan, Utah, and Alviras Snow left Utah and was living in Kansas City, Missouri, before 1935. There are no known children of the first marriage, but she had four children with her second husband. [174] Lillian died September 13, 1939, in Upland, California. [175]

Clarissa Snow McAllister was born July 19, 1854, in Salt Lake City, to parents Lorenzo Snow and Caroline Horton. [176] She married John Archibald McAllister on June 12, 1871, in Salt Lake City. [177] She died October 15, 1917, at Fort Douglas, Utah. [178]

Henry W. Naisbitt was born November 7, 1826, in North Allerton, England, to John Naisbitt and Martha Neede. Naisbitt joined the Church in 1850 and immigrated to the United States in 1854. [179] He married Elizabeth Paul December 24, 1853. [180] After coming to Utah he also married four other women: Mary Ann Luff in October 1862, Catherine Hagell on April 13, 1867, Elizabeth Irvine on April 13, 1870, and Frances Hurst in 1879. [181] Naisbitt also contributed many hymns to both the LDS general and Sunday School hymnbooks. [182] Naisbitt was arrested on the charge of unlawful cohabitation March 19, 1886. [183] On April 30, 1886, he was then convicted of unlawful cohabitation, and on May 11, 1886, was sentenced to six months in prison and a $300 fine. [184] Naisbitt was discharged from the Utah Penitentiary November 11, 1886. [185] On February 3, 1890, Naisbitt was arrested a second time on the charge of unlawful cohabitation. [186] He was sentenced to six months in prison and taken to the penitentiary on May 12, 1890. [187] He was released from the penitentiary October 12, 1890, [188] and he died February 26, 1908. [189]

William Francis Olson was born May 26, 1869, in Fillmore, Millard, Utah, to parents George Daniel Olson and Delilah Cornelia King. He married Annie May Cluff November 27, 1895, in Salt Lake City. They were the parents of four children. He was set apart May 1, 1896, by J. Golden Kimball to serve a mission in Switzerland and Germany and returned August 20, 1898. He served as president of the YMMIA, teacher in Summit Stake Academy, mayor of Price (two terms), and organizer and vice president of Price Commercial and Savings Bank. He married a second time to Daphne Dalton on July 24, 1928. William died January 12, 1953, in Long Beach, California.

Lydia Snow Pierce was born January 21, 1860, in Salt Lake City to parents Lorenzo Snow and Mary Elizabeth Houtz. [190] Lydia married Eli Harvey Pierce. They were the parents of four daughters. She was a YLMIA worker and a teacher at the University of Utah. Mrs. Pierce died December 22, 1898. [191]

George Lewis Savage was born January 27, 1865, in Salt Lake City to parents Charles Roscoe Savage and Annie Fenn Adkins. He married Lana Snow February 22, 1888, in Salt Lake City. [192] They were the parents of Geneva Savage, born July 12, 1892, in Salt Lake City. [193] George Lewis Savage died March 8, 1936, in Salt Lake City. [194]

Alviras E. (or Laurin Alviras) Snow was born December 2, 1863, to parents Lorenzo Snow and Sarah Ann Prichard. [195] He graduated from the University of Utah in the fall of 1882. [196] He married Fanny Lillian Loveland on January 30, 1889, in Logan, Utah. [197] Following Lorenzo Snow’s release from prison, he was accompanied by Alviras in his carriage. [198] He studied law at Columbia University in Washington DC and graduated in 1897. [199]

Eliza R. Snow was born January 21, 1804, in Becket, Berkshire, Massachusetts, daughter to Oliver Snow and Rosetta L. Pettibone and sister to Lorenzo Snow. [200] She was baptized April 5, 1835. [201] She was sealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith June 29, 1842, and widowed at his death on June 27, 1844. [202] She married Brigham Young on October 3, 1844. Eliza R. Snow wrote many poems and hymns. [203] She died December 5, 1887, at the Lion House in Salt Lake City. [204]

Lana Snow Savage was born October 22, 1863, in Brigham City, Utah, to parents Lorenzo Snow and Eleanor Houtz. Lana “spent her childhood in Brigham City” and “was a member of the Christian Science Church.” [205] She married George Lewis Savage February 22, 1888, in Salt Lake City. [206] They were the parents of Geneva Savage, born July 12, 1892, in Salt Lake City. [207] Lana Snow Savage died July 16, 1951, in Salt Lake City.[208]

LeRoi Clarence Snow was born August 26, 1876, in Brigham City, Utah, to parents Lorenzo Snow and Minnie Jensen. [209] He served in many Church positions, including librarian in the Salt Lake Temple, missionary in Germany from 1896 to 1899, [210] and chief tithing clerk. He also served as secretary to the president of the Eastern States Mission in 1921 and in 1922 was called as president of the mission home in Salt Lake City until 1926. [211] He married Maud Mary Ford June 29, 1900, in Salt Lake City. They had one child. [212] He married Burma Celia Thompson on May 10, 1912, in Thatcher, Arizona, and they had three children. [213] LeRoi Snow died December 31 in Salt Lake City. [214]

Lorenzo Lamont Snow was born in Brigham City, Utah, on August 26, 1884. He was the youngest son of President Lorenzo Snow and Minnie Jensen. Snow was a navy captain and retired in Hartford, Connecticut, where he died on May 7, 1954. [215]

Minnie Mabelle Snow was born May 21, 1879, in Brigham City, Utah, to parents Minnie Jensen and Lorenzo Snow. [216] She married Alfred L. Cook of Logan, Utah, on February 10, 1904, in Salt Lake City. [217] She died December 3, 1962.[218]

Minnie Jensen Snow was born October 10, 1854, in Brigham City, Utah, to parents J. P. Jensen and Sarah Clawson. [219] She married Lorenzo Snow June 12, 1871, in Salt Lake City. [220] They were the parents of five children. She was a member of the general board of the YLMIA and three times was sent as a delegate to the National Council of Women. [221] Minnie Jensen Snow died January 2, 1908. [222]

Willard Lycurgus Snow was born March 1842 in Lee County, Iowa, the son of Willard Snow and Melvina Harvey. [223] He married Sarah Ann Bower April 15, 1865, [224] and later married Flora Lewis Mousely on April 13, 1874.[225] Between his two wives, he was father to nineteen children.[226] He was a Black Hawk Indian War Veteran, having served in John R. Winder’s company. [227] He served as superintendent of the Farmers Ward Sunday School and as a member of the bishopric in Draper. He died February 1, 1920, in Forest Dale, Utah. [228]

Samuel Linzey (or Lindsay) Sprague was born March 22 or 23, 1843, in Lowell, Norfolk, Massachusetts, or Salem, Essex, Massachusetts to parents Dr. S.L. Sprague and Mary Woodard. [229] He married Anna Marian Kimball in 1868. He was a deputy United States marshal from 1871 to 1890 and was employed as a guard at the Utah Penitentiary. [230] On February 11, 1887, he made a raid on Church buildings with Marshal Frank Dyer, John Greenman, and others. They were looking for John Taylor and George Q. Cannon, but did not find them. [231] Samuel L. Sprague died May 11, 1900. [232]

Elmina Shepard Taylor was born September 12, 1830, in Middlefield, Otsego, New York, to parents David Spaulding Shepard and Roella Bailey. She married George Hamilton Taylor on August 31, 1856, in Haverstraw, Rockland, New York. George later married two other wives in Utah in 1877 and 1885. Elmina and George were the parents of seven children. [233] Elmina was the president of the YLMIA from 1880 to 1904. [234] She died December 6, 1904, in Salt Lake City. [235]

Stanley Taylor was born February 4, 1838, in Bolton, Lancashire, England, to parents William Taylor and Ann Jones. He married Hannah Howard on May 6, 1863, in Salt Lake City. They were the parents of eleven children. [236] He married second wife Mary Ann Howard on February 3, 1866, and they had eleven children. He was convicted on April 26, 1886, of unlawful cohabitation and sentenced May 10 to the “full penalty of the law—six months’ imprisonment, a fine of $300 and cost of suit.” [237] He died August 13, 1921, in Salt Lake City. [238]

Charles Schuster Zane was born March 21, 1831, in Tuckahoe, Cumberland, New Jersey, to parents Andrew Zane and Mary Franklin. He was educated at McKendree College in Illinois. During his tenure hundreds of people were convicted of illegal cohabitation or polygamy. Judge Zane was the first chief justice of the State of Utah. He died March 29, 1915, in Salt Lake City. [239]

Notes


[1] Frank Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah (Salt Lake City: Western Epics, 1966), 733.

[2] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 733; Salt Lake County (Utah). County Clerk. Record of Marriage Licenses, Books E-G, 1893–1897 (Salt Lake City: Genealogical Society of Utah 1965) microfilm 429056, license no. 5030.

[3] Ancestral File.

[4] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 732.

[5] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 733.

[6] Andrew Jenson, Church Chronology: A Record of Important Events Pertaining to the History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2nd ed. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1914), 125.

[7] Jenson, Church Chronology, 129.

[8] Jenson, Church Chronology, 136.

[9] Jenson, Church Chronology, 188.

[10] Andrew Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901–35), 10.

[11] Jenson, Biographical Encyclopedia, 10.

[12] Fawn Pace Burt, The First Sixty Years of the Twenty-ninth Ward in Salt Lake City (Salt Lake City: n.p., 1964), 114.

[13] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 10.

[14] Jenson, Church Chronology, 127.

[15] Jenson, Church Chronology, 129.

[16] Jenson, Church Chronology, 136.

[17] Burt, First Sixty Years, 115.

[18] United States 1880 Federal Census, Beaver County, Utah, 5; Ancestral File; “W. G. Bickley, Useful and Busy Man, Dies,” Deseret Evening News, August 17, 1917, 10.

[19] “W. G. Bickley,” 10.

[20] United States 1880 Federal Census, Beaver County, Utah, 5.

[21] Ancestral File.

[22] Jenson, Church Chronology, 132–33.

[23] Jenson, Church Chronology, 141.

[24] Ancestral File; “W. G. Bickley,” Deseret Evening News, 10.

[25] “Well Known Woman Dies: Mrs. Melissa Borlase Mourned by Many Throughout State,” Deseret News, February 1912, 3; United States 1880 Federal Census, Salt Lake County, Utah, 305.

[26] Ancestral File.

[27] “Well Known Woman Dies,” 3.

[28] Tooele County Daughters of Utah Pioneers, History of Tooele County (Salt Lake City: Publishers Press, 1961), 427.

[29] History of Tooele County, 427.

[30] History of Tooele County, 428.

[31] Jenson, Church Chronology, 122.

[32] Jenson, Church Chronology, 129.

[33] Jenson, Church Chronology, 135.

[34] History of Tooele County, 428.

[35] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 771.

[36] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 771.

[37] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 771.

[38] “Mrs. Bromley Dies of Paralytic Stroke,” Deseret Evening News, February 26, 1918, 4.

[39] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 771.

[40] Jenson, Church Chronology, 127.

[41] Jenson, Church Chronology, 131.

[42] Jenson, Church Chronology, 135.

[43] Jenson, Church Chronology, 143.

[44] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 771.

[45] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 783.

[46] Jensen, Church Chronology, 122.

[47] Jensen, Church Chronology, 128–29.

[48] Jensen, Church Chronology, 135.

[49] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 783.

[50] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Granite Stake Genealogical Survey, 1920–1924 (Salt Lake City: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950), microfilm 368515.

[51] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 830.

[52] Salt Lake County Clerk, Record of Marriage Licenses, Books E–G, 1893–1897 (Salt Lake: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1965), microfilm 429056, no. 4471; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 830.

[53] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 830.

[54] “Funeral Rites Set Friday for Mrs. Crow, Deseret News, January 2, 1951, 4B.

[55] “Elder George G. Bywater: Funeral Services Held in the Salt Lake Stake Assembly Hall,” Deseret Evening News, May 20, 1898, 5.

[56] Ancestral File.

[57] “Death of Geo. J. Bywater: Well Known Actor and Artist Passed Away in This City Today,” Deseret Evening News, November 6, 1899, 2.

[58] Kate B. Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, vol. 16 (Salt Lake City: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1958), 519.

[59] Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 520.

[60] Orson F. Whitney, History of Utah (Salt Lake City: George Q. Cannon, 1904), 675.

[61] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 789–90.

[62] Jenson, Church Chronology, 38.

[63] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 167.

[64] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 793.

[65] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 168.

[66] Lawrence R. Flake, Mighty Men of Zion: General Authorities of the Last Dispensation (Salt Lake City: Karl D. Butler, 1974), 235.

[67] Jenson, Church Chronology, 120.

[68] Jenson, Church Chronology, 130.

[69] Jenson, Church Chronology, 135.

[70] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 168.

[71] Obituary of Alice C. Cheney, Deseret News, March 20, 1967, B11.

[72] Marriage License of Alice Cannon and Joseph L. Cheney, Salt Lake County, Book 4, page 113, November 14, 1906; Obituary, B11.

[73] “Mrs. Stewart Civic Worker, Dies at 86,” Deseret News and Telegram, March 25, 1961, 14A.

[74] Certificate of Marriage, Barnard J. Stewart to Leonora M. Cannon, September 9, 1899, Salt Lake County, Utah, Book I, 499. Microfilm 429035.

[75] “Mrs. Stewart Civic Worker, Dies at 86,” 14A.

[76] “Mrs. Ellis Dies at Home,” Deseret News, October 7, 1941, 5; Certificate of Marriage, Fred A. Ellis to Mina Cannon, January 17, 1901, Salt Lake County, Utah, Book B, 297.

[77] “Mrs. Ellis Dies at Home,” 5.

[78] “Funeral Is Set for Mrs. Clawson,” Deseret News, February 3, 1941, 1, 3; United States 1900 Federal Census, Salt Lake County, Utah, ED# 39, p. 5, line 67; Salt Lake Eighteenth Ward, Membership Records, 1883–1902 (Salt Lake City: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1951, microfilm 26740), 394.

[79] Ralph B. Simmons, Utah’s Distinguished Personalities: A Biographical Directory of Eminent Contemporaneous Men and Women Who are the Faithful Builders and Defenders of the State, vol. 1 (Salt Lake City: Personality Publishing Company, 1933), 79.

[80] Jenson, Church Chronology, 116.

[81] “Funeral Is Set for Mrs. Clawson,” 3–4.

[82] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 174.

[83] Simmons, Utah’s Distinguished Personalities, 79.

[84] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 178.

[85] Lawrence R. Flake, Mighty Men of Zion: General Authorities of the Last Dispensation (Salt Lake City: Karl D. Butler, 1974), 131.

[86] Simmons, Utah’s Distinguished Personalities, 79.

[87] Jenson, Church Chronology, 114.

[88] Jenson, Church Chronology, 116–117.

[89] Jenson, Church Chronology, 123.

[90] Jenson, Church Chronology, 156.

[91] Flake, Mighty Men of Zion, 131.

[92] Flake, Mighty Men of Zion, 130.

[93] Rexford G. Tugwell, Grover Cleveland (New York: Macmillan, 1968), xiii.

[94] Allan Nevins, Grover Cleveland: A Study in Courage (New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1962), picture titled “Grover Cleveland’s Parents,” n.p.

[95] Tugwell, Grover Cleveland, xvi.

[96] Tugwell, Grover Cleveland, xiv–xv.

[97] Tugwell, Grover Cleveland, xv–xviii.

[98] Tugwell, Grover Cleveland, xviii.

[99] Lorenzo Snow to W. J. Cox, October 16, 1886: “Dear Bro: Sweet smiling June of Eighty seven Will mark thee sixty one and seven . . . ”; Ancestral File.

[100] Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 476.

[101] Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 477.

[102] Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 476–77.

[103] Ancestral File.

[104] Jenson, Church Chronology, 131.

[105] Jenson, Church Chronology, 133.

[106] Jenson, Church Chronology, 141.

[107] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 833.

[108] “Lizzie Cutler Williams: An Appreciation,” Deseret News, July 4, 1914, 12.

[109] Marriage Certificate of Aaron Henry Williams and Elizabeth Ann Cutler, September 27, 1894, Salt Lake County Clerk, license number 4647.

[110] “Lizzie Cutler Williams: An Appreciation,” 12.

[111] Davis Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 1930), 88; “Denney Rites Are Arranged,” Deseret News, September 13, 1937, 12.

[112] Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries, 88.

[113] Jenson, Church Chronology, 131.

[114] Jenson, Church Chronology, 133.

[115] “Lizzie Cutler Williams: An Appreciation,” 12.

[116] Whitney, Orson F., History of Utah, vol. 4 (Salt Lake City: George Q. Cannon & Sons, October 1904), 281–82.

[117] Whitney, History of Utah, 281–82: “Death of Frank H. Dyer,” Deseret Evening News, March 26, 1892, 5.

[118] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 874.

[119] Stan Larson, editor, Prisoner for Polygamy (Chicago: University of Illinois, 1993), 217.

[120] “Hyrum Folsom, Pioneer of 60’s Dies at His Home,” Deseret News, September 24, 1924, 8.

[121] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 876.

[122] Jenson, Church Chronology, 125.

[123] Jenson, Church Chronology, 128–29.

[124] Jenson, Church Chronology, 136.

[125] “Hyrum Folsom, Pioneer of 60’s Dies at His Home,” 8.

[126]The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Genealogical Surveys of L.D.S. Members: Autobiographies and Ancestors, 1924–1929 microfilm (Salt Lake City: Genealogical Society of Utah, 1977), 542.

[127] Genealogical Surveys of L.D.S. Members, 542.

[128] Obituary of Delilah G. Hughes, Deseret News, September 23, 1955, B11.

[129] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 626.

[130] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 627.

[131] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 626–29.

[132] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 629.

[133] “Susa Y. Gates, Church Worker and Writer Dies,” Deseret News, May 27, 1933, 1.

[134] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 893.

[135] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 309.

[136] Jenson, Church Chronology, 127.

[137] Jenson, Church Chronology, 129–30.

[138] Jenson, Church Chronology, 136.

[139] “Hyrum Goff Is Called by Death,” Deseret Evening News, November 25, 1914, 2.

[140] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 893.

[141] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 309.

[142] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 893.

[143] “Maria T. Goff Resident of Midvale Dies after Brief Illness,” Deseret Evening News, May 4, 1932, 3.

[144] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 803.

[145] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 308–9.

[146] “Death of Mrs. Goff: Estimable West Jordan Woman Passes to the Great Beyond,” Deseret Evening News, October 6, 1902, 1.

[147] United States 1880 Federal Census, Salt Lake County, Utah, ED# 52, 37, lines 43–50.

[148] 1880 Federal Census, 37.

[149] Jenson, Church Chronology, 144.

[150] “G. A. R. Comrades Die,” Deseret Evening News, April 17, 1917, 7.

[151] “Aged Woman Answers Call,” Provo Evening Herald, October 28, 1929, 2; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 902.

[152] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 902.

[153] Ancestral File.

[154] “Aged Woman Answers Call,” 2.

[155] Ancestral File.

[156] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 902.

[157] Ancestral File.

[158] “Pioneer Mining Man Buried at Springville,” Deseret Evening News, April 3, 1923, 3.

[159] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 902.

[160] Obituary of Rhoda R. G. Dougall, Deseret News and Telegram, October 3, 1956, B12.

[161] Ancestral File.

[162] “Jens Hansen Dead as Result of Auto Accident,” Deseret Evening News, September 11, 1917, 10.

[163] Larson, Stan, editor, Prisoner for Polygamy: The Memoirs and Letters of Rudger Clawson at the Utah Territorial Penitentiary, 1884–1887 (Chicago: University of Illinois, 1993), 219; Jenson, Church Chronology, 133, 141.

[164] Jenson, Church Chronology, 161.

[165] “Jens Hansen Dead,” 10.

[166] Worker in Church Dies,” Deseret News, October 25, 1939, 20.

[167] “Active Church Worker of S. L. Dies,” Deseret News, April 5, 1948, 19.

[168] “Edna L. S. Lambert, Church Worker, Dies in Cedar City,” Deseret News, May 23, 1957, D7; Ancestral File.

[169] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 994.

[170] “Death’s Sorrowful Work: Alice Lambert Peart Passes from This Mortal Sphere,” Deseret News, July 22, 1899, 8; Marriage Certificate, Salt Lake County, Book I, #7892; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 994.

[171] “Death’s Sorrowful Work,” 8.

[172] Ancestral File.

[173] Marriage Certificate of Alviras Snow and Lillian Fannie Loveland.

[174] Ancestral File.

[175] Ancestral File.

[176] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1173; Ancestral File.

[177] Ancestral File; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1173.

[178] “Mrs. M’Allister Dies after Brief Illness,” Deseret Evening News, October 15, 1917, 14.

[179] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 175.

[180] Ruth J. Martin, Twentieth Ward History, 1856–1979 (n.p., 1979), 36.

[181] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 176.

[182] Martin, Twentieth Ward History, 37.

[183] Jenson, Church Chronology, 130.

[184] Jenson, Church Chronology, 132.

[185] Jenson, Church Chronology, 140.

[186] Jenson, Church Chronology, 181.

[187] Jenson, Church Chronology, 184.

[188] Jenson, Church Chronology, 188.

[189] Martin, Twentieth Ward History, 37.

[190] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1173.

[191] “Sudden Death of Mrs. Pierce,” Deseret News, December 22, 1898, 2.

[192] Ancestral File.

[193] “Pioneer Utah Art Dealer Dies; Funeral Tuesday,” Deseret Evening News, March 9, 1936, 3; Victor Grant Hillard Jr., Descendants of John Hiller of Hadley, MA, Internet site: http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hadley&id=I1185.

[194] “Pioneer Utah,” Deseret Evening News, 3.

[195] Frank Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah (Salt Lake City: Western Epics, 1966), 1173.

[196] Biographical Record of Salt Lake City and Vicinity: Containing Biographies of Well Known Citizens of the Past and Present (Chicago: National Historical Record Company, 1902), 254.

[197] Box Elder County marriages, Book 1, page 38.

[198] Romney, Thomas C., The Life of Lorenzo Snow: Fifth President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Salt Lake City: Sugarhouse Press, 1955), 365.

[199] Ibid.

[200] Andrew Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Later-day Saints (Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901-1935), vol. 1, 693-697..

[201] Ibid.

[202] Ibid.

[203] Ibid.

[204] Ibid.

[205] “Mrs. Savage, Daughter of Pres. Snow, Dies,” Deseret News, July 18, 1951, A5.

[206] Ancestral File.

[207] “Pioneer Utah Art Dealer Dies; Funeral Tuesday,” Deseret Evening News, March 9, 1936, 3; Hillard, Jr., Victor Grant, Descendants of John Hiller of Hadley, MA, Internet site: http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hadley&id=I1185 , accessed March 17, 2001.

[208] “Mrs. Savage, Daughter,” Deseret News, A5.

[209] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1173; Ancestral File.

[210] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 716.

[211] “LeRoi C. Snow, Mission Home Ex-Leader, Dies,” Deseret News and Telegram, January 1, 1963, 18B.

[212] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 716; Salt Lake County Marriage Licenses, Book J, #9372.

[213] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 716; “LeRoi C. Snow Dies,” Deseret News, 18B.

[214] “LeRoi C. Snow Dies,” Deseret News, 18B.

[215] “Lorenzo L. Snow, Son of Church President, Dies,” Deseret News and Telegram, May 8, 1954, B5; Ancestral File.

[216] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1173; Ancestral File.

[217] Salt Lake County Marriage Licenses, Book O, no. 14057.

[218] Ancestral File.

[219] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 5.

[220] Ancestral File.

[221] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 5.

[222] “Death of Mrs. Minnie J. Snow,” Deseret Evening News, 5.

[223] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 101, 1174.

[224] “Utah Pioneer of 1847 Is Buried at Draper,” Deseret Evening News, February 14, 1920, 7.

[225] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 101, 1174.

[226] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 574.

[227] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 101, 1174; “Utah Pioneer,” Deseret Evening News, 7.

[228] “Utah Pioneer,” Deseret Evening News, 7.

[229] “Samuel L. Sprague Dead,” Deseret Evening News, May 12, 1900, 1; Black, Susan Easton, compiler, Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830–1848, vol. 41 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Department of Church History and Doctrine, Brigham Young University, 1989), 38; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1179.

[230] Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1179.

[231] Jenson, Church Chronology, 144.

[232] “Samuel L. Sprague Dead,” 1; Jenson, Church Chronology, 4; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1179.

[233] Ancestral File; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men, 1201; Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 267.

[234] Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, 267.

[235] Ancestral File; “Young Ladies’ President Dead,” Deseret Evening News, November 6, 1904, 1.

[236] Ancestral File; Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 178–200.

[237] Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 178–200.

[238] “Last Call Comes to Early Settler of Utah,” Deseret News, August 15, 1921, 6.

[239] “Judge Charles S. Zane Called Suddenly by Death,” Deseret Evening News, March 20, 1915, 14.